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This is an email from Pattern Matching, a newsletter by OneZero.

The Privatized Internet Is Failing Our Kids

The failure of online schooling highlights a basic flaw in our digital infrastructure: It wasn’t built to supply public goods.

Third grader Ava Dweck takes an online class from a friend’s home in Las Vegas, Nevada. Photo: Ethan Miller/Getty Images

Welcome back to Pattern Matching, OneZero’s weekly newsletter that puts the week’s most compelling tech stories in context.

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The undercurrents of the future. A publication from Medium about technology and people.

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Will Oremus

Will Oremus

Senior Writer, OneZero, at Medium

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