ConstitutionDAO — How Crypto Folks Plan to Buy the US Constitution

They’ve put together +$40 million in 4 days.

Alberto Romero
OneZero
Published in
7 min readNov 18, 2021

--

Photo by Mike Flippo on Shutterstock

More than 200 years ago a group of people defied the all-powerful United Kingdom and made history. Today, standing on the shoulders of those giants but looking into the future, another group of people plans to go down in history.

In 1787, America’s founding fathers gathered in the Philadelphia convention to delineate the legal frame of a newborn country. They wrote seven articles that gave form to what’s now considered the “oldest, continuing codified government charter in the world” — the U.S. Constitution.

Only 11 copies remain from the 500 that were originally printed. Among those, only one is still in private hands. Howard Goldman bought it in 1988 and now Dorothy Goldman, his wife — and the current owner — , has decided to sell it. This Thursday at 6:30 pm EST Sotheby’s is going to auction this “extremely rare official first-edition printed copy” of the Constitution, valued at $15–20 million. Selby Kiffer, senior vice president at Sotheby’s, said that “the Goldman Constitution ranks as one of the most rare and coveted historical documents that has ever come to auction.”

As such, it has attracted attention from those who are both interested in historical documents and rich enough to afford them. But not only. As a last-minute surprise a new player aims to bid for — and win — this copy of the U.S. Constitution. But it isn’t a person. It’s a group of people that perfectly represents the fast-changing times we’re living.

ConstitutionDAO — The law for the people, owned by the people

The Constitution starts with the words “We the people.” These words were intended to portray the government as an organism to serve everyone, rejecting the — then hegemonic — imperialist yoke imposed by King George III of the United Kingdom. Now, a group of crypto investors has decided to materialize those words — by collectively bidding for the document.

The U.S. Constitution “represents … a lot of the same things that the web3 ethos shares with the United States,” says Packy McCormick, a web3 advisor and core contributor of the project. The group has taken advantage…

--

--