Can a Computer Ever Learn to Talk?

An A.I. expert surveys the state of machine communication, from Stu-Bot to OpenAI’s controversial predictive text generator

Melanie Mitchell
OneZero
Published in
21 min readNov 18, 2019

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Illustration: Simoul Alva

InIn the opening to The Lost World, Michael Crichton’s 1995 sequel to Jurassic Park, Ian Malcolm gives a lecture at the illustrious Santa Fe Institute (SFI), an elite research facility in the high desert of northern New Mexico. Malcolm, you might recall, is an awkward but prescient mathematician and chaos theorist; in Jurassic Park he warned of disaster and barely escaped being eaten by a T. rex. In the sequel, Malcolm is back in top form, lecturing to a rapt audience of SFI scientists about “Life at the Edge of Chaos.”

While Ian Malcolm is a fictional character, the Santa Fe Institute is a real place, and in 1995 I was a member of its faculty. Like all the SFI staff, I was outwardly amused but secretly delighted that our institute was featured in a blockbuster sci-fi thriller. The rumor was that Crichton had based the skeptical Ian Malcolm on an actual iconoclastic SFI scientist named Stuart Kauffman. Not only did The Lost World quote Kauffman in its epigraph, but Malcolm’s fictional lecture sounded suspiciously similar to some of Kauffman’s writings.

One day at lunch the institute’s librarian announced, while laughing, that the…

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Melanie Mitchell
OneZero

Professor at Portland State University and Santa Fe Institute. Latest book: “Artificial Intelligence: A Guide for Thinking Humans” (Farrar, Straus, and Giroux).