Blue Light Isn’t as Bad as You Think

The rays from our screens aren’t as toxic as Grimes and Warby Parker might suggest

Kelli María Korducki
OneZero

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Credit: John Lamb/Getty Images

WWhen art-pop ingenue Grimes shared a midsummer Instagram post detailing her out-of-this-world “training regimen,” spectators wondered whether the elfin Canadian artist had gone full Silicon Valley or was merely having fun at the expense of her boyfriend, Tesla CEO Elon Musk.

Explaining that she takes a “360 approach” to fitness, Grimes detailed an elaborate wellness program steeped in the biohacking sensibilities that have become a hallmark of the tech industry elite. Her purported routine includes mitochondria-boosting supplements, high-grade infrared lighting, and several hours in a sensory deprivation tank that allows her to “astroglide to other dimensions.”

Yet what stood out for many was the artist’s assertion that she underwent “experimental surgery” to eliminate blue light from her vision. The surgery, according to Grimes, “remove[d] the top film of my eyeball and replace[d] it with an orange ultra-flex polymer that my friend and I made in the lab this past winter as a means to cure seasonal depression.”

Grimes’ experimentation with light frequencies isn’t totally left field. Biomedical researchers have been studying the mechanisms that drive different light…

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Kelli María Korducki
OneZero
Writer for

Writer, editor. This is where I post about ideas, strategies, and the joys of making an NYC-viable living as a self-employed creative.